Author and journalist Toby Young has been named the new director of New Schools Network (NSN), the government backed charity to support and promote

Labour MP Lucy Powell has criticised London’s grammar schools for educating a ‘shamefully low’ number of pupils from poor backgrounds.

School league tables should include a measure of well-being, according to university head Sir Anthony Seldon.

113 academy trusts operating in England have run up debts of almost £25 million, according to figures obtained by the BBC.

Education Secretary Justine Greening has defended the government’s proposals to reintroduce grammar schools, saying it will 'absolutely not' mean a

British soul singer and former music supply teacher Laura Mvula has spoken out against cuts to creative subjects in schools, warning that it is limiting opportunities for poorer pupils and will leave music a preserve of the 'privileged few who can afford private lessons'.

Theresa May is right to focus on helping the poorest pupils in English schools but has the ‘wrong tools’ to get the job done, according to the National Association of Head Teachers (NAHT).

Ruth Davison, leader of the Scottish Conservatives, has said she won’t support lifting the ban on opening new grammar schools in Scotland.

The Association of School and College Leaders (ASCL) has warned that plans to lift the ban on opening new grammar schools in England ‘may improve social mobility for a very small number of disadvantaged children, but not for the vast majority’.

Eight unions/education organisations have jointly signed a letter voicing opposition to the government’s grammar school plans.

Addressing the government’s ‘Schools that work for everyone’ green paper for the first time, Mike Buchanan, the chair of the Headmasters and Headmistresses Conference (HMC), has stressed that ‘coercion is unnecessary’ to encourage independent schools to work with the state sector.

Proposed plans to allow faith schools to select all pupils based on religious grounds will lead to ‘increased ethnic and religious segregation across England’, according to the British Humanist Association (BHA).

Prime Minister Theresa May has defended her controversial grammar school proposals and insists that it will not be a return to the 1950s education system.

School governors have given a damning verdict on the government’s performance, with eight in 10 governors having a ‘negative’ view of government policies, according to a survey conducted by the National Governors’ Association (NGA) and TES.

Lord Baker, who served as Education Secretary in the Conservative government from 1986-89, has questioned the government’s target for 90 per cent of pupils to study the English Baccalaureate (Ebacc), claiming that it has a ‘narrow academic focus’.

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